Driving safely in winter

THIS IS A COLLABORATIVE POST

 

Everyone knows that in order to stay safe when driving in winter you have to be sensible ahead of every journey on the road.  Make sure you have cleared any snow from the windscreen and roof of the car, thrown a coat and maybe a blanket in the boot, made a flask of tea or coffee if you are heading off on a long journey… the list isn’t endless but they are all things to think about.  Though I have to admit I am still scraping my windscreen with an old Advantage card so maybe I should pay more attention to my own advice!

How many of those think about our tyres?  So many of us just jump in our cars and really don’t pay much attention to the only bit of the car that touches the road.  The bit that we essentially need to keep us safe.    This is never more important than in the winter.

I have a tyre management system in my car so I generally assume that it will tell me if there is a problem with my tyres.  Which is fine but it doesn’t tell me anything about weather conditions or the road.   Or more importantly the risks that could be up ahead if I don’t pay attention.

Which is why this video was a bit of an eye opener.

This video from Kwik-Fit (your one stop shop for all things new tyres and fitting, as well as regular checks on existing tyres) shows why you really do need to pay attention.   And why you need to make sure you keep your distance (as well as slow down).  You can also follow #StoppingDistances on social media for more info and tips.

Yep, at 70mph your stopping distance once you hit the brakes, is 96m, that’s a long way but it is nothing compared to how long it takes if it is slightly icy on the roads: 771m is the distance it takes to come to a stop at 70mph.   Safe to say that if you are on a motorway travelling at 70mph you are not going to have 771m of clear road ahead of you to stop.   You are going to come into contact with another vehicle way before that point.    And you don’t need me to explain what the consequences of that are.

This is of course on tyres that are in good condition.  If you have tyres that coming to the end of their lifespan that distance is going to be even further.

Which doesn’t even bear thinking about.

 

 

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